osmie: (Default)
For many years, a meme has circulated around the Internet challenging people to have read lots of books on a certain list.  The list is always slightly different, although it's often credited to the BBC. It's often accompanied by an arbitrary (and rather low) benchmark: "Most people have read just 6 of these books!"

Well, the BBC has only once published an extensive reading list of popular books. In 2003, they sponsored a competition called The Big Read, in which Britons wrote in nominations of their favourite books in English. The top 200 vote-getters were published on their website. At no point did they challenge anybody to have read more than 6 of them.

So I'll follow your meme, O taggers of me, but I'll go straight to the source. Here are the BBC's 200 most popular books in Britain, as of seven years ago. Yes, some of them are short stories. Yes, some of them are series. Yes, some books appear on the list twice because they were nominated both within and without their series. Yes, some of them weren't actually written in English, but were nominated anyway, by people who didn't know or who didn't care.  All of these caveats would be silly within a juried list, but in a popular election they're hardly unexpected.

Yes, a few of the titles—notably "Winnie-the-Pooh" and "Moby-Dick"—are inexplicably missing their hyphens.  I'm a little less forgiving here, because you'd think a rudimentary copy edit would have turned up the errors, but introducing one's own amendments is how this meme strayed so far from any authoritative list in the first place.  No, I'll stay true to the list as actually published by the BBC, thanks.

I've emboldened the books & stories & series I've read in full. I've italicized the ones I've begun but put down.  I've underlined the ones where I've only seen the movie.

1. The Lord of the Rings, JRR Tolkien
2. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
3. His Dark Materials, Philip Pullman
4. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
5. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, JK Rowling
6. To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
7. Winnie the Pooh, AA Milne
8. Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell
9. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, CS Lewis
10. Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë
11. Catch-22, Joseph Heller
12. Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë
13. Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks
14. Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier
15. The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger
16. The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame
17. Great Expectations, Charles Dickens
18. Little Women, Louisa May Alcott
19. Captain Corelli's Mandolin, Louis de Bernieres
20. War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy
21. Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell
22. Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone, JK Rowling
23. Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets, JK Rowling
24. Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban, JK Rowling
25. The Hobbit, JRR Tolkien
26. Tess Of The D'Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy
27. Middlemarch, George Eliot
28. A Prayer For Owen Meany, John Irving
29. The Grapes Of Wrath, John Steinbeck
30. Alice's Adventures In Wonderland, Lewis Carroll
31. The Story Of Tracy Beaker, Jacqueline Wilson
32. One Hundred Years Of Solitude, Gabriel García Márquez
33. The Pillars Of The Earth, Ken Follett
34. David Copperfield, Charles Dickens
35. Charlie And The Chocolate Factory, Roald Dahl
36. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
37. A Town Like Alice, Nevil Shute
38. Persuasion, Jane Austen
39. Dune, Frank Herbert
40. Emma, Jane Austen
41. Anne Of Green Gables, LM Montgomery
42. Watership Down, Richard Adams
43. The Great Gatsby, F Scott Fitzgerald
44. The Count Of Monte Cristo, Alexandre Dumas
45. Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
46. Animal Farm, George Orwell
47. A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens
48. Far From The Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy
49. Goodnight Mister Tom, Michelle Magorian
50. The Shell Seekers, Rosamunde Pilcher

51. The Secret Garden, Frances Hodgson Burnett
52. Of Mice And Men, John Steinbeck
53. The Stand, Stephen King
54. Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy
55. A Suitable Boy, Vikram Seth
56. The BFG, Roald Dahl
57. Swallows And Amazons, Arthur Ransome
58. Black Beauty, Anna Sewell
59. Artemis Fowl, Eoin Colfer
60. Crime And Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
61. Noughts And Crosses, Malorie Blackman
62. Memoirs Of A Geisha, Arthur Golden
63. A Tale Of Two Cities, Charles Dickens
64. The Thorn Birds, Colleen McCollough
65. Mort, Terry Pratchett
66. The Magic Faraway Tree, Enid Blyton
67. The Magus, John Fowles
68. Good Omens, Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
69. Guards! Guards!, Terry Pratchett
70. Lord Of The Flies, William Golding
71. Perfume, Patrick Süskind
72. The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, Robert Tressell
73. Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
74. Matilda, Roald Dahl
75. Bridget Jones's Diary, Helen Fielding
76. The Secret History, Donna Tartt
77. The Woman In White, Wilkie Collins
78. Ulysses, James Joyce
79. Bleak House, Charles Dickens
80. Double Act, Jacqueline Wilson
81. The Twits, Roald Dahl
82. I Capture The Castle, Dodie Smith
83. Holes, Louis Sachar
84. Gormenghast, Mervyn Peake
85. The God Of Small Things, Arundhati Roy
86. Vicky Angel, Jacqueline Wilson
87. Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
88. Cold Comfort Farm, Stella Gibbons
89. Magician, Raymond E Feist
90. On The Road, Jack Kerouac
91. The Godfather, Mario Puzo
92. The Clan Of The Cave Bear, Jean M Auel
93. The Colour Of Magic, Terry Pratchett
94. The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho
95. Katherine, Anya Seton
96. Kane And Abel, Jeffrey Archer
97. Love In The Time Of Cholera, Gabriel García Márquez
98. Girls In Love, Jacqueline Wilson
99. The Princess Diaries, Meg Cabot
100. Midnight's Children, Salman Rushdie

101. Three Men In A Boat, Jerome K. Jerome
102. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
103. The Beach, Alex Garland
104. Dracula, Bram Stoker
105. Point Blanc, Anthony Horowitz
106. The Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens
107. Stormbreaker, Anthony Horowitz
108. The Wasp Factory, Iain Banks
109. The Day Of The Jackal, Frederick Forsyth
110. The Illustrated Mum, Jacqueline Wilson
111. Jude The Obscure, Thomas Hardy
112. The Secret Diary Of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾, Sue Townsend
113. The Cruel Sea, Nicholas Monsarrat
114. Les Misérables, Victor Hugo
115. The Mayor Of Casterbridge, Thomas Hardy
116. The Dare Game, Jacqueline Wilson
117. Bad Girls, Jacqueline Wilson
118. The Picture Of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde
119. Shogun, James Clavell
120. The Day Of The Triffids, John Wyndham
121. Lola Rose, Jacqueline Wilson
122. Vanity Fair, William Makepeace Thackeray
123. The Forsyte Saga, John Galsworthy
124. House Of Leaves, Mark Z. Danielewski
125. The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver
126. Reaper Man, Terry Pratchett
127. Angus, Thongs And Full-Frontal Snogging, Louise Rennison
128. The Hound Of The Baskervilles, Arthur Conan Doyle
129. Possession, A. S. Byatt
130. The Master And Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov
131. The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood
132. Danny The Champion Of The World, Roald Dahl
133. East Of Eden, John Steinbeck
134. George's Marvellous Medicine, Roald Dahl
135. Wyrd Sisters, Terry Pratchett
136. The Color Purple, Alice Walker
137. Hogfather, Terry Pratchett
138. The Thirty-Nine Steps, John Buchan
139. Girls In Tears, Jacqueline Wilson
140. Sleepovers, Jacqueline Wilson
141. All Quiet On The Western Front, Erich Maria Remarque
142. Behind The Scenes At The Museum, Kate Atkinson
143. High Fidelity, Nick Hornby
144. It, Stephen King
145. James And The Giant Peach, Roald Dahl
146. The Green Mile, Stephen King
147. Papillon, Henri Charriere
148. Men At Arms, Terry Pratchett
149. Master And Commander, Patrick O'Brian
150. Skeleton Key, Anthony Horowitz

151. Soul Music, Terry Pratchett
152. Thief Of Time, Terry Pratchett
153. The Fifth Elephant, Terry Pratchett
154. Atonement, Ian McEwan
155. Secrets, Jacqueline Wilson
156. The Silver Sword, Ian Serraillier
157. One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, Ken Kesey
158. Heart Of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
159. Kim, Rudyard Kipling
160. Cross Stitch, Diana Gabaldon
161. Moby Dick, Herman Melville
162. River God, Wilbur Smith
163. Sunset Song, Lewis Grassic Gibbon
164. The Shipping News, Annie Proulx
165. The World According To Garp, John Irving
166. Lorna Doone, R. D. Blackmore
167. Girls Out Late, Jacqueline Wilson
168. The Far Pavilions, M. M. Kaye
169. The Witches, Roald Dahl
170. Charlotte's Web, E. B. White
171. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
172. They Used To Play On Grass, Terry Venables and Gordon Williams
173. The Old Man And The Sea, Ernest Hemingway
174. The Name Of The Rose, Umberto Eco
175. Sophie's World, Jostein Gaarder
176. Dustbin Baby, Jacqueline Wilson
177. Fantastic Mr Fox, Roald Dahl
178. Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
179. Jonathan Livingstone Seagull, Richard Bach
180. The Little Prince, Antoine De Saint-Exupery
181. The Suitcase Kid, Jacqueline Wilson
182. Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens
183. The Power Of One, Bryce Courtenay
184. Silas Marner, George Eliot
185. American Psycho, Bret Easton Ellis
186. The Diary Of A Nobody, George and Weedon Grossmith
187. Trainspotting, Irvine Welsh
188. Goosebumps, R. L. Stine
189. Heidi, Johanna Spyri
190. Sons And Lovers, D. H. LawrenceLife of Lawrence
191. The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Milan Kundera
192. Man And Boy, Tony Parsons
193. The Truth, Terry Pratchett
194. The War Of The Worlds, H. G. Wells
195. The Horse Whisperer, Nicholas Evans
196. A Fine Balance, Rohinton Mistry
197. Witches Abroad, Terry Pratchett
198. The Once And Future King, T. H. White
199. The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle
200. Flowers In The Attic, Virginia Andrews
osmie: (Default)
I was tagged by A. on Facebook with what sounds like an interesting meme. Using only song names from one artist, answer these questions. Pass it on, et cetera, et cetera, standard chain letter wording. You can't use the band I used. Try not to repeat a song title.

I am banned from selecting The Police. Fair enough. I'd rather invite Jane Siberry anyway.

Are you a male or female: This Girl I Know
Describe yourself: Writers Are a Funny Breed
How do you feel: Oh My My
Describe where you currently live: The Walking (and Constantly)
If you could go anywhere, where would you go: Up the Loggin' Road
Your favourite form of transportation: Something about Trains
Your best friend is: See the Child
You and your best friends are: All the Candles in the World
What's the weather like: The Sky Is So Blue
Favourite time of day: The Empty City
If your life were a TV show, what would it be called: Mimi Finally Speaks
What is life to you: Bound by the Beauty
Your relationship: Symmetry (The Way Things Have to Be)
Your fear: It Can't Rain All the Time
What is the best advice you have to give: Say It
Thought for the day: We Should Be There by Morning
How I would like to die: At the Beginning of Time
Soul's present condition: One More Colour
My motto: The Life Is the Red Wagon
osmie: (Default)
I was tagged by A. on Facebook with what sounds like an interesting meme. Using only song names from one artist, answer these questions. Pass it on, et cetera, et cetera, standard chain letter wording. You can't use the band I used. Try not to repeat a song title.

I am banned from selecting The Police. Fair enough. I'd rather invite Jane Siberry anyway.

Are you a male or female: This Girl I Know
Describe yourself: Writers Are a Funny Breed
How do you feel: Oh My My
Describe where you currently live: The Walking (and Constantly)
If you could go anywhere, where would you go: Up the Loggin' Road
Your favourite form of transportation: Something about Trains
Your best friend is: See the Child
You and your best friends are: All the Candles in the World
What's the weather like: The Sky Is So Blue
Favourite time of day: The Empty City
If your life were a TV show, what would it be called: Mimi Finally Speaks
What is life to you: Bound by the Beauty
Your relationship: Symmetry (The Way Things Have to Be)
Your fear: It Can't Rain All the Time
What is the best advice you have to give: Say It
Thought for the day: We Should Be There by Morning
How I would like to die: At the Beginning of Time
Soul's present condition: One More Colour
My motto: The Life Is the Red Wagon

15 books

Jun. 12th, 2009 02:28 pm
osmie: (Default)
--I have read which will always stay with me. The meme directs me to record the first 15 books I think of, rather than taking my time to get the list right. In parentheses I've also noted my age when I first read each one.

(23) Vineland by Thomas Pynchon
(23) S/Z by Roland Barthes
(10) Second Foundation by Isaac Asimov
(28?) Quarantine by Greg Egan
(26) Rynosseros by Terry Dowling
(22) Views from the Oldest House by Richard Grant
(22) The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare
(6) The House on the Cliff by Leslie MacFarlane (as Franklin W. Dixon)
(24) Secular Love by Michael Ondaatje
(3) In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak
(26) "The Martian Child" by David Gerrold
(31) The Years of Rice and Salt by Kim Stanley Robinson
(9) A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madeleine l'Engle
(5) The Happy Planet by Joan Clarke
(33?) A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History by Manuel de Landa

It's a bit startling to see zero books on this list which I first read between 11 and 22. I know I could come up with plenty if I narrowed my focus, but to do so would rather miss the point of the meme. I didn't think of any right away, and so they are not listed. That there's nothing from the past few years either has, I think, more to do with how long it takes before I'm ready to concede the term "always."

15 books

Jun. 12th, 2009 02:28 pm
osmie: (Default)
--I have read which will always stay with me. The meme directs me to record the first 15 books I think of, rather than taking my time to get the list right. In parentheses I've also noted my age when I first read each one.

(23) Vineland by Thomas Pynchon
(23) S/Z by Roland Barthes
(10) Second Foundation by Isaac Asimov
(28?) Quarantine by Greg Egan
(26) Rynosseros by Terry Dowling
(22) Views from the Oldest House by Richard Grant
(22) The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare
(6) The House on the Cliff by Leslie MacFarlane (as Franklin W. Dixon)
(24) Secular Love by Michael Ondaatje
(3) In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak
(26) "The Martian Child" by David Gerrold
(31) The Years of Rice and Salt by Kim Stanley Robinson
(9) A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madeleine l'Engle
(5) The Happy Planet by Joan Clarke
(33?) A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History by Manuel de Landa

It's a bit startling to see zero books on this list which I first read between 11 and 22. I know I could come up with plenty if I narrowed my focus, but to do so would rather miss the point of the meme. I didn't think of any right away, and so they are not listed. That there's nothing from the past few years either has, I think, more to do with how long it takes before I'm ready to concede the term "always."
osmie: (Default)
"Place an X," I am told, "by all the things you've done and remove the X from the ones you have not, then send it to your friends (including me)." Me is on Facebook, and will be tagged there in due course.

Things you have done during your lifetime:
( ) Gone on a blind date
(X) Skipped school
   (The first time I skipped school, I bused to the nearest university to ask a math professor about the gamma function. I was such a nerd.)
(X) Watched someone die
   (He was three. He hadn't been in a booster seat. The CPR didn't take.)
(X) Been to Canada
( ) Been to Mexico
(X) Been to Florida
   (I humiliated myself by delivering an unfinished paper in front of an academic conference.)
(X) Been to Hawaii
(X) Been on a plane
( ) Been on a helicopter
(X) Been lost
   (One snowy Easter in rural Germany, most notably...)
( ) Gone to Washington, DC
(X) Swam in the ocean
(X) Cried yourself to sleep
(X) Played cops and robbers
   (I wanted to be the robber so that my friends the cops wouldn't be unemployed.)
( ) Recently colored with crayons
(X) Sang Karaoke
(X) Paid for a meal with coins only
( ) Been to the top of the St. Louis Arch
(X) Done something you told yourself you wouldn't.
(X) Made prank phone calls
   (I can only plead that I was 11. We laid out a deck of playing cards on the carpet, and tossed coins onto them to generate random phone numbers.)
( ) Been down Bourbon Street in New Orleans
(X) Laughed until some kind of beverage came out of your nose & elsewhere
(X) Caught a snowflake on your tongue
(X) Danced in the rain-naked
( ) Written a letter to Santa Claus
(X) Been kissed under the mistletoe
(X) Watched the sunrise with someone
(X) Blown bubbles
(X) Gone ice-skating
(X) Gone to the movies
( ) Been deep sea fishing
( ) Driven across the United States
( ) Been in a hot air balloon
( ) Been sky diving
( ) Gone snowmobiling
(X) Lived in more than one country
(X) Lain down outside at night and admired the stars while listening to the crickets
(X) Seen a falling star and made a wish
( ) Enjoyed the beauty of Old Faithful Geyser
( ) Seen the Statue of Liberty
(X) Gone to the top of Seattle Space Needle
( ) Been on a cruise
(X) Traveled by train
( ) Traveled by motorcycle
(X) Been horse back riding
( ) Ridden on a San Francisco CABLE CAR
( ) Been to Disneyland --- and Disney World
   (Just the one, I'm afraid.)
(X) Truly believe in the power of prayer
   (...although the power and mechanism are probably not the same ones in which the person who interpolated this entry believes. Incidentally, I also truly believe in the power of faulty parallelism to identify late interpolations.)
(X) Been in a rain forest
(X) Seen whales in the ocean
(X) Been to Niagara Falls
( ) Ridden on an elephant
( ) Swam with dolphins
( ) Been to the Olympics
( ) Walked on the Great Wall of China
( ) Saw and heard a glacier calf
( ) Been spinnaker flying
( ) Been water-skiing
(X) Been snow-skiing (cross-country)
(X) Been to Westminster Abbey
(X) Been to the Louvre
(X) Swam in the Mediterranean
( ) Been to a Major League Baseball game
( ) Been to a National Football League game
( ) Been around the world
   (I'm missing the longitudes between Berlin and Sydney.)
( ) Been to Stonehenge
(X) Been in a lightning storm on the top of a mountain
   (Rather close to where Princess Grace died, in fact. Not quite the top of a mountain, but the strikes were still arriving awfully close by.)
( ) Been in a working submarine, underwater
osmie: (Default)
"Place an X," I am told, "by all the things you've done and remove the X from the ones you have not, then send it to your friends (including me)." Me is on Facebook, and will be tagged there in due course.

Things you have done during your lifetime:
( ) Gone on a blind date
(X) Skipped school
   (The first time I skipped school, I bused to the nearest university to ask a math professor about the gamma function. I was such a nerd.)
(X) Watched someone die
   (He was three. He hadn't been in a booster seat. The CPR didn't take.)
(X) Been to Canada
( ) Been to Mexico
(X) Been to Florida
   (I humiliated myself by delivering an unfinished paper in front of an academic conference.)
(X) Been to Hawaii
(X) Been on a plane
( ) Been on a helicopter
(X) Been lost
   (One snowy Easter in rural Germany, most notably...)
( ) Gone to Washington, DC
(X) Swam in the ocean
(X) Cried yourself to sleep
(X) Played cops and robbers
   (I wanted to be the robber so that my friends the cops wouldn't be unemployed.)
( ) Recently colored with crayons
(X) Sang Karaoke
(X) Paid for a meal with coins only
( ) Been to the top of the St. Louis Arch
(X) Done something you told yourself you wouldn't.
(X) Made prank phone calls
   (I can only plead that I was 11. We laid out a deck of playing cards on the carpet, and tossed coins onto them to generate random phone numbers.)
( ) Been down Bourbon Street in New Orleans
(X) Laughed until some kind of beverage came out of your nose & elsewhere
(X) Caught a snowflake on your tongue
(X) Danced in the rain-naked
( ) Written a letter to Santa Claus
(X) Been kissed under the mistletoe
(X) Watched the sunrise with someone
(X) Blown bubbles
(X) Gone ice-skating
(X) Gone to the movies
( ) Been deep sea fishing
( ) Driven across the United States
( ) Been in a hot air balloon
( ) Been sky diving
( ) Gone snowmobiling
(X) Lived in more than one country
(X) Lain down outside at night and admired the stars while listening to the crickets
(X) Seen a falling star and made a wish
( ) Enjoyed the beauty of Old Faithful Geyser
( ) Seen the Statue of Liberty
(X) Gone to the top of Seattle Space Needle
( ) Been on a cruise
(X) Traveled by train
( ) Traveled by motorcycle
(X) Been horse back riding
( ) Ridden on a San Francisco CABLE CAR
( ) Been to Disneyland --- and Disney World
   (Just the one, I'm afraid.)
(X) Truly believe in the power of prayer
   (...although the power and mechanism are probably not the same ones in which the person who interpolated this entry believes. Incidentally, I also truly believe in the power of faulty parallelism to identify late interpolations.)
(X) Been in a rain forest
(X) Seen whales in the ocean
(X) Been to Niagara Falls
( ) Ridden on an elephant
( ) Swam with dolphins
( ) Been to the Olympics
( ) Walked on the Great Wall of China
( ) Saw and heard a glacier calf
( ) Been spinnaker flying
( ) Been water-skiing
(X) Been snow-skiing (cross-country)
(X) Been to Westminster Abbey
(X) Been to the Louvre
(X) Swam in the Mediterranean
( ) Been to a Major League Baseball game
( ) Been to a National Football League game
( ) Been around the world
   (I'm missing the longitudes between Berlin and Sydney.)
( ) Been to Stonehenge
(X) Been in a lightning storm on the top of a mountain
   (Rather close to where Princess Grace died, in fact. Not quite the top of a mountain, but the strikes were still arriving awfully close by.)
( ) Been in a working submarine, underwater
osmie: (Default)
--specifically, according to someone named Aaron V. Humphrey, "Since I'm tired of the BBC trying to tell us what we should have read (only some of which I agree with), I thought I'd come up with something geared a little more for "my people", the science fiction and fantasy reading community. As a start, at least, I'm going to go through the Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy award winners, with a bonus section for the Auroras. Mark each one with x. (If you want, you can also indicate your opinion of a particular book with +'s or -'s.)"

I received this meme from Robert Runte on Facebook.

Because HTML markup is fun, I'm going to boldface the books I've read, and colour them green or red to indicate any strong opinions.  Because black starts to look like dark green to me, I've coloured the more neutral opinions blue.

1. Alfred Bester:The Demolished Man (H1953)
2. Mark Clifton & Frank Riley:They'd Rather Be Right (a.k.a. The Forever Machine) (H1955)
3. Robert A. Heinlein:Double Star (H1956)
4. Fritz Leiber:The Big Time (H1958)
5. James Blish:A Case of Conscience (H1959)
6. Robert A. Heinlein:Starship Troopers (H1960)
7. Walter M. Miller, Jr.:A Canticle For Leibowitz (H1961)
8. Robert A. Heinlein:Stranger In A Strange Land (H1962)
9. Philip K. Dick:The Man In The High Castle (H1963)
10. Clifford D. Simak:Way Station (a.k.a. Here Gather The Stars) (H1964)
11. Fritz Leiber:The Wanderer (H1965)
12. Frank Herbert:Dune (H1966, N1965)
13. Roger Zelazny:This Immortal (a.k.a. ...And Call Me Conrad) (H1966)
14. Robert A. Heinlein:The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress (H1967)
15. Roger Zelazny:Lord of Light (H1968)
16. John Brunner:Stand On Zanzibar (H1969)
17. Ursula K. Le Guin:The Left Hand of Darkness (H1970, N1969)
18. Larry Niven:Ringworld (H1971, N1970)
19. Philip José Farmer:To Your Scattered Bodies Go (H1972)
20. Isaac Asimov:The Gods Themselves (H1973, N1972)
21. Arthur C. Clarke:Rendezvous With Rama (H1974, N1973)
22. Ursula K. Le Guin:The Dispossessed (H1975, N1974)
23. Joe Haldeman:The Forever War (H1976, N1975)
24. Kate Wilhelm:Where Late The Sweet Birds Sang (H1977)
25. Frederik Pohl:Gateway (H1978, N1977)
26. Vonda McIntyre:Dreamsnake (H1979, N1978)
27. Arthur C. Clarke:The Fountains of Paradise (H1980, N1979)
28. Joan D. Vinge:The Snow Queen (H1981)
29. C.J. Cherryh:Downbelow Station (H1982)
30. Isaac Asimov:Foundation's Edge (H1983)
31. David Brin:Startide Rising (H1984, N1983)
32. William Gibson:Neuromancer (H1985, N1984)
33. Orson Scott Card:Ender's Game (H1986, N1985)
34. Orson Scott Card:Speaker For The Dead (H1987, N1986)
35. David Brin:The Uplift War (H1988)
36. C.J. Cherryh:Cyteen (H1989)
37. Dan Simmons:Hyperion (H1990)
38. Lois McMaster Bujold:The Vor Game (H1991)
39. Lois McMaster Bujold:Barrayar (H1992)
40. Vernor Vinge:A Fire Upon The Deep (H1993)
41. Connie Willis:Doomsday Book (H1993, N1992)
42. Kim Stanley Robinson:Green Mars (H1994)
43. Lois McMaster Bujold:Mirror Dance (H1995)
44. Neal Stephenson:The Diamond Age, or A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer (H1996)
45. Kim Stanley Robinson:Blue Mars (H1997)
46. Joe Haldeman:Forever Peace (H1998, N1998)
47. Connie Willis:To Say Nothing of The Dog (H1999)
48. Vernor Vinge:A Deepness In The Sky (H2000)
49. J.K. Rowling:Harry Potter And The Goblet of Fire (H2001)
50. Neil Gaiman:American Gods (H2002, N2002)
51. Robert J. Sawyer:Hominids (H2003)
52. Lois McMaster Bujold:Paladin of Souls (H2004, N2004)
53. Susanna Clarke:Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell (H2005, F2005)
54. Robert Charles Wilson:Spin (H2006)
55. Vernor Vinge:Rainbows End (H2007)
56. Michael Chabon:The Yiddish Policemen's Union (H2008, N2007)
57. Samuel R. Delany:Babel-17 (N1966)
58. Daniel Keyes:Flowers For Algernon (N1966)
59. Samuel R. Delany:The Einstein Intersection (N1967)
60. Alexei Panshin:Rite of Passage (N1968)
61. Robert Silverberg:A Time of Changes (N1971)
62. Frederik Pohl:Man Plus (N1976)
63. Gregory Benford:Timescape (N1980)
64. Gene Wolfe:The Claw of The Conciliator (N1981)
65. Michael Bishop:No Enemy But Time (N1982)
66. Pat Murphy:The Falling Woman (N1987)
67. Lois McMaster Bujold:Falling Free (N1988)
68. Elizabeth Ann Scarborough:The Healer's War (N1989)
69. Ursula K. Le Guin:Tehanu: The Last Book of Earthsea (N1990)
70. Michael Swanwick:Stations of The Tide (N1991)
71. Kim Stanley Robinson:Red Mars (N1993)
72. Greg Bear:Moving Mars (N1994)
73. Robert J. Sawyer:The Terminal Experiment (N1995, A1996)
74. Nicola Griffith:Slow River (N1996)
75. Vonda McIntyre:The Moon And The Sun (N1997)
76. Octavia E. Butler:Parable of The Talents (N1999)
77. Greg Bear:Darwin's Radio (N2000)
78. Catherine Asaro:The Quantum Rose (N2001)
79. Elizabeth Moon:The Speed of Dark (N2003)
80. Joe Haldeman:Camouflage (N2005)
81. Jack McDevitt:Seeker (N2006)
82. Patricia A. McKillip:The Forgotten Beasts of Eld (F1975)
83. Richard Matheson:Bid Time Return (F1976)
84. William Kotzwinkle:Doctor Rat (F1977)
85. Fritz Leiber:Our Lady of Darkness (F1978)
86. Michael Moorcock:Gloriana (F1979)
87. Elizabeth A. Lynn:Watchtower (F1980)
88. Gene Wolfe:The Shadow of The Torturer (F1981)
89. John Crowley:Little, Big (F1982)
90. Michael Shea:Nifft The Lean (F1983)
91. John M. Ford:The Dragon Waiting (F1984)
92. Robert Holdstock:Mythago Wood (F1985)
93. Barry Hughart:Bridge of Birds (F1985)
94. Dan Simmons:Song of Kali (F1986)
95. Patrick Suskind:Perfume (F1987)
96. Ken Grimwood:Replay (F1988)
97. Peter Straub:Koko (F1989)
98. Jack Vance:Lyonesse: Madouc (F1990)
99. James Morrow:Only Begotten Daughter (F1991)
100. Robert R. McCammon:Boy's Life (F1992)
101. Tim Powers:Last Call (F1993)
102. Lewis Shiner:Glimpses (F1994)
103. James Morrow:Towing Jehovah (F1995)
104. Christopher Priest:The Prestige (F1996)
105. Rachel Pollack:Godmother Night (F1997)
106. Jeffrey Ford:The Physiognomy (F1998)
107. Louise Erdrich:The Antelope Wife (F1999)
108. Martin Scott:Thraxas (F2000)
109. Tim Powers:Declare (F2001)
110. Sean Stewart:Galveston (F2001)
111. Ursula K. Le Guin:The Other Wind (F2002)
112. Graham Joyce:The Facts of Life (F2003)
113. Patricia A. McKillip:Ombria In Shadow (F2003)
114. Jo Walton:Tooth And Claw (F2004)
115. Haruki Murakami:Kafka On The Shore (F2006)
116. Gene Wolfe:Soldier of Sidon (F2007)
117. Guy Gavriel Kay:Ysabel (F2008)
118. Eileen Kernaghan:Songs From The Drowned Lands (A1985)
119. Guy Gavriel Kay:The Wandering Fire (A1987)
120. Charles De Lint:Jack The Giant Killer (A1988)
121. William Gibson:Mona Lisa Overdrive (A1989)
122. Dave Duncan:West of January (A1990)
123. Guy Gavriel Kay:Tigana (A1991)
124. Robert J. Sawyer:Golden Fleece (A1992)
125. Sean Stewart:Passion Play (A1993)
126. Sean Stewart:Nobody's Son (A1994)
127. William Gibson:Virtual Light (A1995)
128. Robert J. Sawyer:Starplex (A1997)
129. Candas Jane Dorsey:Black Wine (A1998)
130. Robert Charles Wilson:Darwinia (A1999)
131. Robert J. Sawyer:Flashforward (A2000)
132. Eileen Kernaghan:The Snow Queen (A2001)
133. Julie E. Czerneda:In The Company of Others (A2002)
134. Karl Schroeder:Permanence (A2003)
135. Robert Charles Wilson:Blind Lake (A2004)
136. Edo van Belkom:Wolf Pack (A2005)
137. Karin Lowachee:Cagebird (A2006)
138. Dave Duncan:Children of Chaos (A2007)
139. Nalo Hopkinson:The New Moon's Arms (A2008)

H = Hugo Award for Best Novel
N = Nebula Award for Best Novel
F = World Fantasy Award for Best Novel
A = Aurora Award for Best Long-Form Work in English (or equivalent)

In all, I've read 81 of 139, or 58%, which is not bad perhaps, until you consider that I decided around 1992 to seek out and read precisely this list of books.  (You can kind of tell that I fell from this particular bandwagon around 1997:  I'm at 68% on award winners up to 1996, 23% thereafter.)

osmie: (Default)
--specifically, according to someone named Aaron V. Humphrey, "Since I'm tired of the BBC trying to tell us what we should have read (only some of which I agree with), I thought I'd come up with something geared a little more for "my people", the science fiction and fantasy reading community. As a start, at least, I'm going to go through the Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy award winners, with a bonus section for the Auroras. Mark each one with x. (If you want, you can also indicate your opinion of a particular book with +'s or -'s.)"

I received this meme from Robert Runte on Facebook.

Because HTML markup is fun, I'm going to boldface the books I've read, and colour them green or red to indicate any strong opinions.  Because black starts to look like dark green to me, I've coloured the more neutral opinions blue.

1. Alfred Bester:The Demolished Man (H1953)
2. Mark Clifton & Frank Riley:They'd Rather Be Right (a.k.a. The Forever Machine) (H1955)
3. Robert A. Heinlein:Double Star (H1956)
4. Fritz Leiber:The Big Time (H1958)
5. James Blish:A Case of Conscience (H1959)
6. Robert A. Heinlein:Starship Troopers (H1960)
7. Walter M. Miller, Jr.:A Canticle For Leibowitz (H1961)
8. Robert A. Heinlein:Stranger In A Strange Land (H1962)
9. Philip K. Dick:The Man In The High Castle (H1963)
10. Clifford D. Simak:Way Station (a.k.a. Here Gather The Stars) (H1964)
11. Fritz Leiber:The Wanderer (H1965)
12. Frank Herbert:Dune (H1966, N1965)
13. Roger Zelazny:This Immortal (a.k.a. ...And Call Me Conrad) (H1966)
14. Robert A. Heinlein:The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress (H1967)
15. Roger Zelazny:Lord of Light (H1968)
16. John Brunner:Stand On Zanzibar (H1969)
17. Ursula K. Le Guin:The Left Hand of Darkness (H1970, N1969)
18. Larry Niven:Ringworld (H1971, N1970)
19. Philip José Farmer:To Your Scattered Bodies Go (H1972)
20. Isaac Asimov:The Gods Themselves (H1973, N1972)
21. Arthur C. Clarke:Rendezvous With Rama (H1974, N1973)
22. Ursula K. Le Guin:The Dispossessed (H1975, N1974)
23. Joe Haldeman:The Forever War (H1976, N1975)
24. Kate Wilhelm:Where Late The Sweet Birds Sang (H1977)
25. Frederik Pohl:Gateway (H1978, N1977)
26. Vonda McIntyre:Dreamsnake (H1979, N1978)
27. Arthur C. Clarke:The Fountains of Paradise (H1980, N1979)
28. Joan D. Vinge:The Snow Queen (H1981)
29. C.J. Cherryh:Downbelow Station (H1982)
30. Isaac Asimov:Foundation's Edge (H1983)
31. David Brin:Startide Rising (H1984, N1983)
32. William Gibson:Neuromancer (H1985, N1984)
33. Orson Scott Card:Ender's Game (H1986, N1985)
34. Orson Scott Card:Speaker For The Dead (H1987, N1986)
35. David Brin:The Uplift War (H1988)
36. C.J. Cherryh:Cyteen (H1989)
37. Dan Simmons:Hyperion (H1990)
38. Lois McMaster Bujold:The Vor Game (H1991)
39. Lois McMaster Bujold:Barrayar (H1992)
40. Vernor Vinge:A Fire Upon The Deep (H1993)
41. Connie Willis:Doomsday Book (H1993, N1992)
42. Kim Stanley Robinson:Green Mars (H1994)
43. Lois McMaster Bujold:Mirror Dance (H1995)
44. Neal Stephenson:The Diamond Age, or A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer (H1996)
45. Kim Stanley Robinson:Blue Mars (H1997)
46. Joe Haldeman:Forever Peace (H1998, N1998)
47. Connie Willis:To Say Nothing of The Dog (H1999)
48. Vernor Vinge:A Deepness In The Sky (H2000)
49. J.K. Rowling:Harry Potter And The Goblet of Fire (H2001)
50. Neil Gaiman:American Gods (H2002, N2002)
51. Robert J. Sawyer:Hominids (H2003)
52. Lois McMaster Bujold:Paladin of Souls (H2004, N2004)
53. Susanna Clarke:Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell (H2005, F2005)
54. Robert Charles Wilson:Spin (H2006)
55. Vernor Vinge:Rainbows End (H2007)
56. Michael Chabon:The Yiddish Policemen's Union (H2008, N2007)
57. Samuel R. Delany:Babel-17 (N1966)
58. Daniel Keyes:Flowers For Algernon (N1966)
59. Samuel R. Delany:The Einstein Intersection (N1967)
60. Alexei Panshin:Rite of Passage (N1968)
61. Robert Silverberg:A Time of Changes (N1971)
62. Frederik Pohl:Man Plus (N1976)
63. Gregory Benford:Timescape (N1980)
64. Gene Wolfe:The Claw of The Conciliator (N1981)
65. Michael Bishop:No Enemy But Time (N1982)
66. Pat Murphy:The Falling Woman (N1987)
67. Lois McMaster Bujold:Falling Free (N1988)
68. Elizabeth Ann Scarborough:The Healer's War (N1989)
69. Ursula K. Le Guin:Tehanu: The Last Book of Earthsea (N1990)
70. Michael Swanwick:Stations of The Tide (N1991)
71. Kim Stanley Robinson:Red Mars (N1993)
72. Greg Bear:Moving Mars (N1994)
73. Robert J. Sawyer:The Terminal Experiment (N1995, A1996)
74. Nicola Griffith:Slow River (N1996)
75. Vonda McIntyre:The Moon And The Sun (N1997)
76. Octavia E. Butler:Parable of The Talents (N1999)
77. Greg Bear:Darwin's Radio (N2000)
78. Catherine Asaro:The Quantum Rose (N2001)
79. Elizabeth Moon:The Speed of Dark (N2003)
80. Joe Haldeman:Camouflage (N2005)
81. Jack McDevitt:Seeker (N2006)
82. Patricia A. McKillip:The Forgotten Beasts of Eld (F1975)
83. Richard Matheson:Bid Time Return (F1976)
84. William Kotzwinkle:Doctor Rat (F1977)
85. Fritz Leiber:Our Lady of Darkness (F1978)
86. Michael Moorcock:Gloriana (F1979)
87. Elizabeth A. Lynn:Watchtower (F1980)
88. Gene Wolfe:The Shadow of The Torturer (F1981)
89. John Crowley:Little, Big (F1982)
90. Michael Shea:Nifft The Lean (F1983)
91. John M. Ford:The Dragon Waiting (F1984)
92. Robert Holdstock:Mythago Wood (F1985)
93. Barry Hughart:Bridge of Birds (F1985)
94. Dan Simmons:Song of Kali (F1986)
95. Patrick Suskind:Perfume (F1987)
96. Ken Grimwood:Replay (F1988)
97. Peter Straub:Koko (F1989)
98. Jack Vance:Lyonesse: Madouc (F1990)
99. James Morrow:Only Begotten Daughter (F1991)
100. Robert R. McCammon:Boy's Life (F1992)
101. Tim Powers:Last Call (F1993)
102. Lewis Shiner:Glimpses (F1994)
103. James Morrow:Towing Jehovah (F1995)
104. Christopher Priest:The Prestige (F1996)
105. Rachel Pollack:Godmother Night (F1997)
106. Jeffrey Ford:The Physiognomy (F1998)
107. Louise Erdrich:The Antelope Wife (F1999)
108. Martin Scott:Thraxas (F2000)
109. Tim Powers:Declare (F2001)
110. Sean Stewart:Galveston (F2001)
111. Ursula K. Le Guin:The Other Wind (F2002)
112. Graham Joyce:The Facts of Life (F2003)
113. Patricia A. McKillip:Ombria In Shadow (F2003)
114. Jo Walton:Tooth And Claw (F2004)
115. Haruki Murakami:Kafka On The Shore (F2006)
116. Gene Wolfe:Soldier of Sidon (F2007)
117. Guy Gavriel Kay:Ysabel (F2008)
118. Eileen Kernaghan:Songs From The Drowned Lands (A1985)
119. Guy Gavriel Kay:The Wandering Fire (A1987)
120. Charles De Lint:Jack The Giant Killer (A1988)
121. William Gibson:Mona Lisa Overdrive (A1989)
122. Dave Duncan:West of January (A1990)
123. Guy Gavriel Kay:Tigana (A1991)
124. Robert J. Sawyer:Golden Fleece (A1992)
125. Sean Stewart:Passion Play (A1993)
126. Sean Stewart:Nobody's Son (A1994)
127. William Gibson:Virtual Light (A1995)
128. Robert J. Sawyer:Starplex (A1997)
129. Candas Jane Dorsey:Black Wine (A1998)
130. Robert Charles Wilson:Darwinia (A1999)
131. Robert J. Sawyer:Flashforward (A2000)
132. Eileen Kernaghan:The Snow Queen (A2001)
133. Julie E. Czerneda:In The Company of Others (A2002)
134. Karl Schroeder:Permanence (A2003)
135. Robert Charles Wilson:Blind Lake (A2004)
136. Edo van Belkom:Wolf Pack (A2005)
137. Karin Lowachee:Cagebird (A2006)
138. Dave Duncan:Children of Chaos (A2007)
139. Nalo Hopkinson:The New Moon's Arms (A2008)

H = Hugo Award for Best Novel
N = Nebula Award for Best Novel
F = World Fantasy Award for Best Novel
A = Aurora Award for Best Long-Form Work in English (or equivalent)

In all, I've read 81 of 139, or 58%, which is not bad perhaps, until you consider that I decided around 1992 to seek out and read precisely this list of books.  (You can kind of tell that I fell from this particular bandwagon around 1997:  I'm at 68% on award winners up to 1996, 23% thereafter.)

osmie: (Default)
If you read this, if your eyes are passing over this right now, please post a comment with a COMPLETELY MADE UP AND FICTIONAL memory of you and me. It can be anything you want -- good or bad -- BUT IT HAS TO BE FAKE. When you're finished, if you'd like to continue the chain, post this little paragraph on your blog and be surprised (or mortified) about what people DON'T ACTUALLY remember about you.
osmie: (Default)
If you read this, if your eyes are passing over this right now, please post a comment with a COMPLETELY MADE UP AND FICTIONAL memory of you and me. It can be anything you want -- good or bad -- BUT IT HAS TO BE FAKE. When you're finished, if you'd like to continue the chain, post this little paragraph on your blog and be surprised (or mortified) about what people DON'T ACTUALLY remember about you.
osmie: (Default)
Having risen to the challenge of writing 16 things about myself, I now find myself twice tagged to write 25.

Here are nine more. Once this note hits Facebook, I'm sure I will tag nine more people. To those tagged: you're welcome to pick up this meme, or not, as you please. You're here because something in one of these notes reminded me of you.


#17. On a tandem bicycle )

#18. Mentem sanam inspicere non debet )

#19. Spine labels in obscure classifications )

#20. She could write it on a card )

#21. How smart I am )

#22. My cat peed on my keyboard case )

#23. We travelled through the leg muscles )

#24. A novel about my life )

#25. What experiences do I cling to )
osmie: (Default)
Having risen to the challenge of writing 16 things about myself, I now find myself twice tagged to write 25.

Here are nine more. Once this note hits Facebook, I'm sure I will tag nine more people. To those tagged: you're welcome to pick up this meme, or not, as you please. You're here because something in one of these notes reminded me of you.


#17. On a tandem bicycle )

#18. Mentem sanam inspicere non debet )

#19. Spine labels in obscure classifications )

#20. She could write it on a card )

#21. How smart I am )

#22. My cat peed on my keyboard case )

#23. We travelled through the leg muscles )

#24. A novel about my life )

#25. What experiences do I cling to )
osmie: (Default)
Because I am grownupper now and my soundtrack has clearly changed.

Opening Credits: Anniversary by me! That's a pretty good choice, actually...
Waking Up: Hey You by David Palmer and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, covering Pink Floyd.
First Day at High School: Follow Me Down to Carlow by the Elektra Women's Choir.
Falling In Love: You Ruined Everything by Jonathan Coulton. I have no comment to make on this matter at this time.
Breaking Up: World Keeps Spinning by the Brand New Heavies.
Prom: Love Games by Strange Advance.
Life: Straw Hat and Old Dirty Hank by Barenaked Ladies. Ahem. Your Honour, I can explain.
Mental Breakdown: Ship to Shore by Chris de Burgh.
Driving: I'll Be Home for Christmas by the Nylons.
Wedding: New Year's Gift by Theatre of Voices.
Birth of Child: The Show Must Go On by Pink Floyd.
Final Battle: Send Me Energy by Gowan.
Death Scene: Witchmelt from The Wizard of Oz soundtrack. Woot!
Funeral Song: Waltz of the Flowers from The Nutcracker.
End Credits: Sell-Out Agitation Waltz by Richard and Mimi Fariña.
osmie: (Default)
Because I am grownupper now and my soundtrack has clearly changed.

Opening Credits: Anniversary by me! That's a pretty good choice, actually...
Waking Up: Hey You by David Palmer and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, covering Pink Floyd.
First Day at High School: Follow Me Down to Carlow by the Elektra Women's Choir.
Falling In Love: You Ruined Everything by Jonathan Coulton. I have no comment to make on this matter at this time.
Breaking Up: World Keeps Spinning by the Brand New Heavies.
Prom: Love Games by Strange Advance.
Life: Straw Hat and Old Dirty Hank by Barenaked Ladies. Ahem. Your Honour, I can explain.
Mental Breakdown: Ship to Shore by Chris de Burgh.
Driving: I'll Be Home for Christmas by the Nylons.
Wedding: New Year's Gift by Theatre of Voices.
Birth of Child: The Show Must Go On by Pink Floyd.
Final Battle: Send Me Energy by Gowan.
Death Scene: Witchmelt from The Wizard of Oz soundtrack. Woot!
Funeral Song: Waltz of the Flowers from The Nutcracker.
End Credits: Sell-Out Agitation Waltz by Richard and Mimi Fariña.
osmie: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] scotia_girl referenced a "100 books" meme which hasn't been on my friends list yet, so I scanned hers to grab a copy. Gnarr.

Typically, it's a bold what you've read, underline what you loved, strike out what you hated sort of meme. It also includes instructions for things you do or do not plan to read, which seems like a silly concept to me; I have no idea what I might read in the future. And so I'll italicize those which I've read only in translation, and viridize those authors by whom I've read other work, not on the list.

I dislike the fact that some of these items are short stories (e.g. "A Christmas Carol") and some are vast compilations (e.g. The Complete Works of Shakespeare), and so I've opted to narrow things down slightly by replacing each collection with its own first, or most famous, item. This leads, however, to a second annoyance: for two items on the list (Hamlet and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe) are already the appropriate representatives of two such compilations (ibid, The Chronicles of Narnia). And so I have replaced these latter compilations with The Canterbury Tales and Gulliver's Travels, both of them coherent works of which many people read only about half.

I've also given all these books back their original titles. Not only is it careless to refer to Winnie-the-Pooh and Moby-Dick without the hyphens, but in a list so dominated by English-language literature, it also seems dismissive to hide the foreign works under translated names.

To be honest, I'm impressed by the representation of 19th, 20th and 21st-century literature, and of English, Irish, American and Canadian authors. There's greater breadth here than one normally sees in such lists. But surely Jane Austen didn't need to make the list four times in order to bring the gender imbalance down to a measly 3:1 -- and there could be a good deal more African, Caribbean, Australian and New Zealand literature: where is Doris Lessing? Janet Frame? Wole Soyinka? J.M. Coetzee? Derek Walcott? Zadie Smith? And among contemporary bestselling American populists, why choose Dan Brown over Stephen King?

Cave umbilicum. )
osmie: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] scotia_girl referenced a "100 books" meme which hasn't been on my friends list yet, so I scanned hers to grab a copy. Gnarr.

Typically, it's a bold what you've read, underline what you loved, strike out what you hated sort of meme. It also includes instructions for things you do or do not plan to read, which seems like a silly concept to me; I have no idea what I might read in the future. And so I'll italicize those which I've read only in translation, and viridize those authors by whom I've read other work, not on the list.

I dislike the fact that some of these items are short stories (e.g. "A Christmas Carol") and some are vast compilations (e.g. The Complete Works of Shakespeare), and so I've opted to narrow things down slightly by replacing each collection with its own first, or most famous, item. This leads, however, to a second annoyance: for two items on the list (Hamlet and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe) are already the appropriate representatives of two such compilations (ibid, The Chronicles of Narnia). And so I have replaced these latter compilations with The Canterbury Tales and Gulliver's Travels, both of them coherent works of which many people read only about half.

I've also given all these books back their original titles. Not only is it careless to refer to Winnie-the-Pooh and Moby-Dick without the hyphens, but in a list so dominated by English-language literature, it also seems dismissive to hide the foreign works under translated names.

To be honest, I'm impressed by the representation of 19th, 20th and 21st-century literature, and of English, Irish, American and Canadian authors. There's greater breadth here than one normally sees in such lists. But surely Jane Austen didn't need to make the list four times in order to bring the gender imbalance down to a measly 3:1 -- and there could be a good deal more African, Caribbean, Australian and New Zealand literature: where is Doris Lessing? Janet Frame? Wole Soyinka? J.M. Coetzee? Derek Walcott? Zadie Smith? And among contemporary bestselling American populists, why choose Dan Brown over Stephen King?

Cave umbilicum. )
osmie: (Default)
Gakked from Facebook, but I find memes work better in these parts.

Step 1: Put your music player on shuffle.
Step 2: Post the first line from the first 50 songs that play, no matter how embarrassing.
Step 3: Strike out the songs when someone guesses both artist and track correctly.
Step 4: Looking them up on Google or any other search engine is, of course, cheating.
Step 5: If you like the game post your own!

The songs... )

Current standings: 6 comments, 14 right answers, and [livejournal.com profile] fimmtiu surges into the lead with 4...

Edit: Probably everyone who's going to play this game has now already played it, but I'm going to make life easier for whoever's left. Here's an alphabetical list of the artists whose tracks you have not yet named. (Note that some of these artists appear more than once.)

The hints... )

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